Unsettling Reconciliation: towards decolonising land and rights relations in Canada

Esme Murdock’s article Unsettling Reconciliation: Decolonial Methods for Transforming Social-Ecological Systems. is just published in Environmental Values (27.5 October 2018). In today’s blog she explains the article’s genesis and motivation. This blog is part of an occasional series in collaboration with NiCHE. How do we talk about the painful, violent distance between ourselves and the … More Unsettling Reconciliation: towards decolonising land and rights relations in Canada

Environmental History Workshop: intersections across space and time

In this blog John Morgan reports on last week’s inaugural Environmental History Workshop which we followed with great interest and with which we plan next year to establish a formal engagement. Last week, the Institute of Historical Research in London was host to the inaugural Environmental History Workshop. Sponsored by the Royal Historical Society, the … More Environmental History Workshop: intersections across space and time

Environmental History in Spain: Eyeing the Future from the Past.

In today’s blog, which featured in the August 2018 issue (Volume 24.3) of Environment and History as the ESEH Notepad, Antonio Ortega Santos presents a useful overview of environmental history research and publications in Spain which may not be well-known to anglophone audiences.  The research field of Environmental History in Spain has been developing for … More Environmental History in Spain: Eyeing the Future from the Past.

II The flounder and the Danes: Rebuilding a fishery on the North Aral Sea

This is part two of William Wheeler’s Aral Sea blog, linked to his forthcoming paper in Global Environment. The first part appeared last week. Here William describes a Danish-led project to regenerate Aral Sea fisheries in the post-Soviet period, against the prevailing narrative of a ‘dead’ Sea. In the previous part of this blog, I … More II The flounder and the Danes: Rebuilding a fishery on the North Aral Sea

I. The Aral Sea disaster

In today’s blog, the first in a two part series, William Wheeler ruminates on the ‘disaster discourse’ and the local human experience of the Aral Sea regression, subject of his forthcoming article in Global Environment (Special Issue on Disasters and Property guest-edited by Marc Elie and Fabien Locher, forthcoming September 2018).  Disasters, as anthropologists have … More I. The Aral Sea disaster

Islands of the Danube: An Unwritten History

In today’s blog, Stefan Dorondel (of the Francisc I. Rainer Institute of Anthropology, Bucharest and The Institute for Southeast European Studies of the Romanian Academy) makes the case for greater study of river islands and wetlands by environmental historians, presenting an overview of the islands in the lower Danube explored in more historical detail in his article … More Islands of the Danube: An Unwritten History

Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes

In today’s blog, Martin Drenthen of Radboud University previews the Special Issue of Environmental Values on Rewilding which he has edited (Environmental Values 27/4 August 2018). Whereas natural areas are still disappearing at a rapid pace in many parts of the world, in other parts species are coming back and landscapes are becoming more wild … More Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes

Italian eco-narratives. Paths into the nationalisation of forests

In today’s blog, Roberta Biasillo and Marco Armiero discuss Italian forest narratives and how they may be read. The blog is inspired by their article in Environment and History, published in January 2018 (online first) That Italy’s embodied narratives begin or coincide with the natural-cultural features of its territory is obvious. This happens here just … More Italian eco-narratives. Paths into the nationalisation of forests

Ottoman and Turkish Environmental History: An Overview of the Field

This overview by Onur Inal was originally published in Environment and History 24/2 (May 2018) as the ‘Notepad’ of ESEH Ottoman and Turkish studies is a field that incorporates diverse geographic regions and long periods of history, providing fertile ground for environmental history. For the past several years, researchers in the field, including me, have grumbled … More Ottoman and Turkish Environmental History: An Overview of the Field

Saving Niagara From Itself: Emotional and Environmental History at Niagara Falls

[This blog was originally posted by NiCHE (Network in Canadian History and Environment)] In today’s blog piece, Daniel Macfarlane introduces the innovative blend of emotional and environmental history that informs his new article in Environment and History (Online first, May 2018), ‘Saving Niagara From Itself: The Campaign to Preserve and Enhance the American Falls, 1965–1975′. … More Saving Niagara From Itself: Emotional and Environmental History at Niagara Falls