Feeding Fish to Factory Farms

In this blog, Floor Haalboom introduces her thought-provoking Environment and History article ‘Oceans and Landless Farms: Linking Southern and Northern Shadow Places of Industrial Livestock (1954–1975’, recently made Open Access. A ‘radical change’ in the diet of farm animals attracted the interest of the Dutch Health Council – a body of experts advising the Dutch … More Feeding Fish to Factory Farms

Elemental and Ephemeral Encounters with the Man of Stones

In today’s blog, Tom Greaves, who will take over as editor of Environmental Values in January 2022 reflects on what an unusual new acquaintance has taught him about the interplay of the elemental and ephemeral in the lived experience of nature and place. In recent weeks I’ve made an unusual acquaintance. The Man of Stones is an … More Elemental and Ephemeral Encounters with the Man of Stones

ECOTONE SCHOLARSHIP AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE

In this blog, originally published as the ICEHO pages in Global Environment 13.3 (October 2021), Shannon Stunden Bower proposes the need to think anew about the relations between environmental history, policy change and systems change. In spring 2011, environmental historians and historical geographers gathered in southern Ontario. Their meeting was organised by the Network in … More ECOTONE SCHOLARSHIP AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE

H2O in Gaza

In this blog, Troy Sternberg, geographer and sometime White Horse Press author of both books and articles in Nomadic Peoples reports on his experiences In Gaza, filming for the current BBC4 series H20: The Molecule that Made Us. (All images courtesy of Freddie Claire). Walking into Gaza – well there is no such thing. After … More H2O in Gaza

Rewilding – the conservation approach that dare not speak its name

In today’s blog, Virgina Thomas introduces her just-published paper in Environmental Values, ‘Domesticating rewilding: interpreting rewilding in England’s green and pleasant land’ It’s well known that the word ‘rewilding’ polarises views. To some ‘the R word’ is ‘toxic’, ‘threatening’ and ‘alienating’. For others, it has a ‘pizzazz’ which has ‘caught the popular imagination’ and creates … More Rewilding – the conservation approach that dare not speak its name

Coastal Cities and Urban Deltascapes under Pressure: Quo Vadis Homo Narrans?

Today’s blog gives a sneak preview of Global Environment 14.3 on Coastal Cities, due out next week. Guest editor Grit Martinez introduces the issue. Coastal shores and river deltas have always attracted people to congregate. Presently, an estimated forty per cent of the population worldwide live within 100 kilometres of the coast, including many cities … More Coastal Cities and Urban Deltascapes under Pressure: Quo Vadis Homo Narrans?

ESEH ROUND-UP OF RECENT INITIATIVES

While we all eagerly await the delayed ESEH conference in Bristol, 4-8 July 2022, the Society has been busy bringing the environmental history community together in virtual space. Here, in a piece originally published as the ESEH Notepad in Environment and History 27.3 (August 2021) some of the organisers of these initiatives describe and reflect … More ESEH ROUND-UP OF RECENT INITIATIVES

HOW MANY SPINES DOES A CACTUS HAVE? REFLECTIONS ON OXFORD’S 5TH INTERDISCIPLINARY DESERT CONFERENCE (1–2 JULY 2021)

In this blog Manannan Donoghoe reports on the Oxford Deserts Conference held in early July which sadly did not have its traditional White Horse Press attendance due to COVID. We’ll be back for the 6th! Editor Saverio Krätli represented Nomadic Peoples very effectively. This piece will also be published in NP 25.2 (September 2021). How … More HOW MANY SPINES DOES A CACTUS HAVE? REFLECTIONS ON OXFORD’S 5TH INTERDISCIPLINARY DESERT CONFERENCE (1–2 JULY 2021)