Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes

In today’s blog, Martin Drenthen of Radboud University previews the Special Issue of Environmental Values on Rewilding which he has edited and which will appear in August 2018. Whereas natural areas are still disappearing at a rapid pace in many parts of the world, in other parts species are coming back and landscapes are becoming … More Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes

Italian eco-narratives. Paths into the nationalisation of forests

In today’s blog, Roberta Biasillo and Marco Armiero discuss Italian forest narratives and how they may be read. The blog is inspired by their article in Environment and History, published in January 2018 (online first) That Italy’s embodied narratives begin or coincide with the natural-cultural features of its territory is obvious. This happens here just … More Italian eco-narratives. Paths into the nationalisation of forests

Ottoman and Turkish Environmental History: An Overview of the Field

This overview by Onur Inal was originally published in Environment and History 24/2 (May 2018) as the ‘Notepad’ of ESEH Ottoman and Turkish studies is a field that incorporates diverse geographic regions and long periods of history, providing fertile ground for environmental history. For the past several years, researchers in the field, including me, have grumbled … More Ottoman and Turkish Environmental History: An Overview of the Field

Saving Niagara From Itself: Emotional and Environmental History at Niagara Falls

[This blog was originally posted by NiCHE (Network in Canadian History and Environment)] In today’s blog piece, Daniel Macfarlane introduces the innovative blend of emotional and environmental history that informs his new article in Environment and History (Online first, May 2018), ‘Saving Niagara From Itself: The Campaign to Preserve and Enhance the American Falls, 1965–1975′. … More Saving Niagara From Itself: Emotional and Environmental History at Niagara Falls

Elusive Traces: African Baobabs in India

In this blog Haripriya Rangan describes the genesis and development of her co-written article with Karen Bell on African baobabs in India and the human story to be glimpsed behind the movement across the Indian Ocean of these charismatic trees – ‘Elusive Traces: Baobabs and the African Diaspora in South Asia’. The article, originally published … More Elusive Traces: African Baobabs in India

Endangered enemies: culture, history and human–wildlife conflict

In today’s blog, Meera Oomen reflects on human–animal conflict and traditional and modern strategies for its management. One instance of such conflict is explored in more depth in her forthcoming article for Environment and History, ‘The elephant in the room: histories of place, memory and conflict with wildlife along a southern Indian forest fringe’ available … More Endangered enemies: culture, history and human–wildlife conflict

The emotional impact of working on climate change: the experience of scientists and activists

Drawing on findings from their article in Environmental Values 27.3 (June 208), ‘Engaging with Climate Change: Comparing the Cultures of Science and Activism’, Paul Hoggett and Rosemary Randall here examine the emotional challenges faced by climate scientists and activists. Climate change and interconnected crises such as species extinction and resource depletion present humankind with unprecedented … More The emotional impact of working on climate change: the experience of scientists and activists

Thinking About Food Consumption and Its Impact

In today’s blog post, Michelle Mart previews the forthcoming issue of Global Environment, ‘Consuming the World: Eating and Drinking in Culture, History, and the Environment’ (March 2018) co-edited by her and Dan Philippon. The special issue of Global Environment, ‘Consuming the World: Eating and Drinking in Culture, History, and the Environment’, began with what Dan … More Thinking About Food Consumption and Its Impact

Transversal bridging of African and womanist standpoints: Seeking a life-affirming global ethic

In her article in Environmental Values 27.3 (June 2018) entitled ‘Ubuntu and ecofeminism: Value-building with African and womanist voices’, Inge Konik (University of the Free State) engages in a transversal theoretical bridging of the African ethic of ubuntu and materialist ecological feminism. In this blog she summarises the key arguments of her article, which she posits … More Transversal bridging of African and womanist standpoints: Seeking a life-affirming global ethic

Hazardous commodities: Australian live animal export from the long nineteenth century to today

In today’s blog Nancy Cushing discusses the contemporary inspiration for her new paper in Environment and History, ‘ “Few Commodities are More Hazardous”: Australian Live Animal Export, 1788–1880’, now available through Ingenta FastTrack. My scholarly interest in Australia’s live animal export trade can be traced back to a very specific event: the 2011 exposure of the … More Hazardous commodities: Australian live animal export from the long nineteenth century to today