Coastal Cities and Urban Deltascapes under Pressure: Quo Vadis Homo Narrans?

Today’s blog gives a sneak preview of Global Environment 14.3 on Coastal Cities, due out next week. Guest editor Grit Martinez introduces the issue. Coastal shores and river deltas have always attracted people to congregate. Presently, an estimated forty per cent of the population worldwide live within 100 kilometres of the coast, including many cities … More Coastal Cities and Urban Deltascapes under Pressure: Quo Vadis Homo Narrans?

ESEH ROUND-UP OF RECENT INITIATIVES

While we all eagerly await the delayed ESEH conference in Bristol, 4-8 July 2022, the Society has been busy bringing the environmental history community together in virtual space. Here, in a piece originally published as the ESEH Notepad in Environment and History 27.3 (August 2021) some of the organisers of these initiatives describe and reflect … More ESEH ROUND-UP OF RECENT INITIATIVES

HOW MANY SPINES DOES A CACTUS HAVE? REFLECTIONS ON OXFORD’S 5TH INTERDISCIPLINARY DESERT CONFERENCE (1–2 JULY 2021)

In this blog Manannan Donoghoe reports on the Oxford Deserts Conference held in early July which sadly did not have its traditional White Horse Press attendance due to COVID. We’ll be back for the 6th! Editor Saverio Krätli represented Nomadic Peoples very effectively. This piece will also be published in NP 25.2 (September 2021). How … More HOW MANY SPINES DOES A CACTUS HAVE? REFLECTIONS ON OXFORD’S 5TH INTERDISCIPLINARY DESERT CONFERENCE (1–2 JULY 2021)

Sustainable Infrastructure: In Search of an Oxymoron

This blog is the conclusion to Chapter 2 of Tim Killeen’s serialised Open Access monograph A Perfect Storm in the Amazon Wilderness. You can read the whole chapter, and Chapter 1, via the Rachel Carson Center Environment and Society portal (PDF) or on our website (PDF or ePub) The macroeconomic hypothesis that infrastructure investments stimulate … More Sustainable Infrastructure: In Search of an Oxymoron

Socially-engaged environmental history: An ESEH ‘notepad’

This blog piece appeared as the ESEH Notepad in the May 2021 issue of Environment and History. In the midst of so many serious socio-ecological problems, many environmental historians are keen that their work might ‘make a difference’ beyond academic discourse. For this Notepad, to stimulate further reflection and debate, we asked four ESEH members: … More Socially-engaged environmental history: An ESEH ‘notepad’

From Placing Gender to the Responsibilities of Practice: ‘Doing’ and ‘Being’ in Environmental History

by Karen R. Jones, editor of Environment and History Since Carolyn Merchant’s famous study on science, patriarchy and ‘the Death of Nature’ (1980), scholars have successively refined the lens of gender analysis to effectively deconstruct the historical relationships between humans, environments and other species. In their introduction to a recent special issue of Environment and History (May … More From Placing Gender to the Responsibilities of Practice: ‘Doing’ and ‘Being’ in Environmental History

Rolf-Peter Sieferle: It’s the ecology, stupid!

It is twenty years since The White Horse Press published Sieferle’s important work The Subterranean Forest. In this short opinion piece Michael Karl reflects on the life of this eminent, but controversial, historian. One need not work as a historian by profession to be aware of the time passing – tempus fugit. Old folk (like myself) can easily … More Rolf-Peter Sieferle: It’s the ecology, stupid!

Working paper on sustainable history: the responsibilities of academic historians in a climate-impacted world

This working paper was produced in early 2020 by Andrea Gaynor, Carla Pascoe Leahy, Ruth Morgan, Daniel May and Yves Rees1 to start a conversation about how academic historians can help to address the climate and biodiversity crises in their professional practice. We are delighted to be able to contribute to its further dissemination and … More Working paper on sustainable history: the responsibilities of academic historians in a climate-impacted world

Spanish-language Profile of Timothy J. Killeen’s A Perfect Storm in the Amazon Wilderness

Courtesy of our friends at Halac, here is a Spanish-language profile of Tim Killeen’s A Perfect Storm in the Amazon Wilderness, the first chapter of which was published Open Access last month. Timothy J. Killeen presenta su nueva e importante monografía de acceso abierto, que será publicada en serie por The White Horse Press a … More Spanish-language Profile of Timothy J. Killeen’s A Perfect Storm in the Amazon Wilderness